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Htilominlo Pahto

Attraction Bagan, Myanmar Published on: 13-11-2015

Rating

Time to visit

2 hours 30 mins

Opening hours

08:00 AM - 05:00 PM

Should visit at

09:00 AM

Should leave before

10:30 AM

Good for travellers

First-time visit

Category

Attraction
Family
Must see
Kids
Architecture
Temple & Monument

Price range

20.00 USD

Htilominlo Pahto is good for

Good for family with kids Family with kids Good
Good for senior Senior Good
Good for couple Couple Good
Good for solo Solo Good
Good for group Group Good
  • Highly recommended by fellow travellers.
Htilominlo Temple is a Buddhist temple located in Bagan, in Burma/Myanmar, built during the reign of King Htilominlo (also known as Nandaungmya)

Image copyrights belong to authors

Why Htilominlo Pahto is special ?

The Htilominlo temple is a large majestic structure towering 46 meters high. Its design is similar to that of the Sulamani, which was build about three decades earlier by the previous King. The monument is named after its builder, King Htilominlo who was also known as Zeya Theinkha and Nadaungmyar.


According to legend, Htilominlo was chosen to be the next King out of the five sons of King Narapatisithu. The five sons stood in a circle with a white umbrella in the center. When the umbrella would tilt and point towards one of the sons, that son was to be the next King. As the umbrella pointed towards Htilominlo, he was chosen. It is said that the Htilominlo pagoda was built on the spot where he was selected as the next King.


Source: https://www.renown-travel.com/

What to explore at Htilominlo Pahto?

Built on a low platform the temple makes for a large three story red brick structure along with a touch of stone. The masterpiece was originally adorned with carved white stucco. Today, though you will only be able to view just the bare remains of the exquisite details, you cannot help but wonder what the temple actually looked like when it was covered entirely with stucco. Like most of the other Bagan masterpieces, this one also suffered damages of an earthquake, only to be restored later. Htilominlo was damaged by an earthquake in the year 1975.

The square base of the temple is 140 feet on each side and its design is quite similar to that of the earlier Sulamani Pahto that was built by the ruler’s father. However, compared to Sulamani the lower ambulatory of this structure (read Htilominlo) offers a greater feel of verticality.

Source: http://minglabar.net/

Selling points

  • Elaborate plaster moldings
  • Fine plaster carvings and glazed sandstone decorations
  • A large majestic structure
  • Fine murals on the interior walls
  • A large three story red brick
Dreams of Myanmar

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Duration
7.0 days
Estimated
267.34 USD
Total travel distance
km
Number of places
21 places

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Location

Address

Bagan, Myanmar

Plan a trip to Bagan based on your personalized interests.

Tips for you

  • You can climb to the first storey, from where you can get a wonderful view of the Bagan plain.
    Things to do
  • Outside, you can also watch the craftsmen making their sand paints as a copy of the paints that decorate the walls of the temples of Bagan.
    What to see
  • You should bring a torchlight, sunglasses and enjoy the sight, red bricks might leave a stain, so watch it.
    What to bring
  • The road leading to the temple has a lot of vendors on it and many kids trying to sell postcards. Beware that they will follow you around the temple.
    Experience
  • All the vendors are on the perimeter which is nice because it's your choice if you want to buy something.You are not hassled all the time.
    Things nearby
  • There are four golden Buddhas looking toward each cardinal point, which are connected by a channel that you can follow and go around the temple without going out.
    What to know
  • Due to earthquake damages, visitors are not allowed into the upper levels. But there is plenty to see on the ground level.
    What to know
  • If you snap photos of the long-necked hill-tribes they will demand "Lucky-money". Other vendors are also very pushy.
    What to know

Reviews

TripAdvisor View more

Htilominlo is one of the temples to represent Bagan. It's said that the style is typically Bagan style. Inside, there're 4 golden Buddha at each 4 sides. You can go to the top of the adjacent monastry. The view from there is special. A girl aggressively toured the temple and brought us to the top. Later we found she was working at one of the souvenir shops around the temple. She was very pushy so don't be bothered if you're not interested in souvenirs.There's a checkpoint at this temple. They ask you to show the receipt of entrance fee for Bagan, which you shoudl've paied when you enter Bagan district.

TripAdvisor View more

Our tour guide did not seem so interested in explaining the history or significance of this place so we wandered around and found the two Padaung women who were weaving and their nephew who was charging to have the ladies picture taken. We saw several arts and craft shops. The entrance to the pagoda was intricate but the inside, as some other reviewers mentioned, was boring.

TripAdvisor View more

Make sure you visit this place, but don't waste time inside (unless you need a cool-down). The interior is pretty boring, but the outside is breathtaking and you must climb to the upper levels to enjoy a fantastic view!

TripAdvisor View more

Another white temple. This is one of the bigger ones too. What can I say that I haven't already said about all the other temples - in the end, they are all the same hence what I say here is also the same. Just another temple photo - if I don't subtitle them right away, I will forget as they all look the same in the end - so templed out. So pagoda-out and so monastery-out.

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